With Lincoln in the White House:: Letters. Memoranda, and by Michael Burlingame

By Michael Burlingame

From the time of Lincoln’s nomination for the presidency until eventually his assassination, John G. Nicolay served because the Civil warfare president’s leader own secretary. Nicolay turned an intimate of Lincoln and possibly knew him in addition to somebody open air his circle of relatives. not like John Hay, his subordinate, Nicolay stored no diary, yet he did write numerous memoranda recording his chief’s dialog that shed direct gentle on Lincoln. In his many letters to Hay, to his fiancée, Therena Bates, and to others, Nicolay usually describes the temper on the White condo in addition to occasions there. He additionally expresses reviews that have been in all likelihood formed by means of the president

           

For this quantity, Michael Burlingame contains all of Nicolay’s memoranda of conversations, the entire magazine entries describing Lincoln’s actions, and excerpts from lots of the approximately 300 letters Nicolay wrote to Therena Bates among 1860 and 1865. He comprises letters and parts of letters that describe Lincoln or the temper on the White residence or that provide Nicolay’s own evaluations. He additionally contains letters written by means of Nicolay whereas on troubleshooting missions for the president.

           

An impoverished early life, Nicolay was once an not likely candidate for the $64000 place he held throughout the Civil struggle. It used to be simply over the robust objections of a few robust people who he grew to become Lincoln’s inner most secretary after Lincoln’s nomination for the presidency in 1860. admired Chicago Republican Herman Kreismann came across the appointment of a guy so missing in savoir faire

“ridiculous.” Henry Martin Smith, urban editor of the Chicago Tribune, referred to as Nicolay’s appointment a countrywide loss. Henry C.Whitney used to be stunned that the president could rent a “nobody.”

           

Lacking appeal, Nicolay turned recognized on the White residence because the “bulldog within the ante-room” with a disposition “sour and crusty.” California journalist Noah Brooks deemed Nicolay a “grim Cerberus of Teutonic descent who guards the final door which opens into the grim presence.” Yet in many ways he was once ideally suited for the tough activity. William O. Stoddard, noting that Nicolay was once now not renowned and will “say 'no'about as disagreeably as any guy I ever knew,” still granted that Nicolay served Lincoln good simply because he was once committed and incorruptible. Stoddard concluded that Nicolay “deserves the thank you of all who enjoyed Mr. Lincoln.”

           

For his half, Nicolay stated he derived his maximum pride “from having loved the privilege and honor of being Mr. Lincoln’s intimate and reliable inner most secretary, and of incomes his cordial friendship and excellent trust.”

           

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With Lincoln in the White House:: Letters. Memoranda, and other Writings of John G. Nicolay, 1860-1865

From the time of Lincoln’s nomination for the presidency until eventually his assassination, John G. Nicolay served because the Civil battle president’s leader own secretary. Nicolay turned an intimate of Lincoln and doubtless knew him in addition to an individual open air his family. in contrast to John Hay, his subordinate, Nicolay saved no diary, yet he did write a number of memoranda recording his chief’s dialog that shed direct gentle on Lincoln.

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Extra resources for With Lincoln in the White House:: Letters. Memoranda, and other Writings of John G. Nicolay, 1860-1865

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He would probably know in a few days. ) the State Department, but would offer him, what he supposed would be most congenial, and for which he was certainly in every way qualified, viz: the Attorney Generalship. Mr. Bates replied by saying that until a very few days ago, he had received no word or hint even that any of his friends had made any such application in his behalf. He expressed himself highly gratified at the confidence which Mr. L. manifested in him by the offer just made. He alluded to the fact that [ ] years ago he had declined a similar offer made by Mr.

Then," said I, "there is an important rumor you have not seen. The Times correspondent telegraphs that Buchanan has sent instructions to Maj. ) who had written me that he had just had a long conversation with Gen. Scott, and that the General felt considerably outraged that the President would not act as he wished him to in reinforcing the forts &c. I wrote to Washburne to tell Gen. " To Therena Bates, Springfield, 30 December I86096 . . Mr. Lincoln and I moved out of our room at the State House yesterday.

But for particulars I must refer you to the "Star" I mailed you this morning. I cannot yet form much of an idea how I shall like it here. For two or three months the work will of course be pretty laborious. After that I expect to find some time for both recreation and study. 37 To Therena Bates, Washington, 14 March 186138 . . I sit down in the hurry and confusion of my morning work, having a few minutes to spare just now, to merely say that I am still well, and getting through the almost overwhelming pressure of work which is upon me, with, I think a wonderful degree of good temper.

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