And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street by Dr. Seuss

By Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss’s first actual ebook for kids! From a trifling horse and wagon, younger Marco concocts a colourful solid of characters, making Mulberry road the main attention-grabbing situation on the town. Dr. Seuss’s signature rhythmic textual content, mixed together with his unmistakable illustrations, will attract lovers of every age, who will cheer while our hero proves little mind's eye can move a truly good way. (Who wouldn’t cheer while an elephant-pulled sleigh raced by?) Now over seventy-five years previous, this tale is as undying as ever. And Marco’s singular form of optimism is usually obvious in McElligot’s Pool.

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Bennet is angry that her daughters have returned sooner than she planned. CHAPTER THIRTEEN The Reverend William Collins, Mr. Bennet’s cousin and heir, now enters the story. He writes a letter inviting himself to Longbourn for a two-week stay. Mr. Bennet is amused by the letter, which goes on and on with explanations, apologies, and self-important remarks. Mr. Collins arrives. He admires his fair cousins and hints at more than admiration. He praises the house, every room, all the furniture and furnishings piece by piece.

Mrs. Bennet expresses her joy in the same way she expressed her disappointment earlier—excessively. She is already planning when she can invite the newcomer to dinner. CHAPTER THREE Mr. Bingley returns Mr. Bennet’s visit, but he does not see the young ladies. They, however, try to watch him from an upstairs window, although all they can see is that he wears a blue coat and rides a black horse. NOTE: By having the sisters watch Bingley from a window, Austen shows us how restricted they are, compared with the young men such as Bingley, who have much more freedom.

He praises the house, every room, all the furniture and furnishings piece by piece. Mr. Bennet is entertained. Mrs. Bennet is gratified—until she remembers that what he is admiring will one day be his, when Mr. Bennet dies and the detestable Mr. Collins turns her and her daughters out into the cold. No effort at explanation can make her understand the entail. NOTE: Mr. Collins’s entrance is one of pure comedy. This chapter and the next are two of the funniest in the novel, but notice how Austen also uses these scenes to develop her plot.

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