And All the Earth a Grave by C.C. MacApp

By C.C. MacApp

This number of literature makes an attempt to collect a few of the vintage works that experience stood the attempt of time and supply them at a discounted, reasonable fee, in an enticing quantity in order that every body can get pleasure from them.

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This selection of literature makes an attempt to bring together some of the vintage works that experience stood the try of time and supply them at a discounted, cheap fee, in an enticing quantity in order that all people can take pleasure in them.

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409, where the deaf were said to be liable to guardianship. [92] See 1 Jones Eq. (N. ), 221. In 4 Johns. , 441, a New York case in 1820, it was said by Chancellor Kent that the deaf and dumb were considered prima facie as insane, incapable of making a will and fit subjects for guardianship, by the civil law. The presumption was due, he said, to the fact that "want of hearing and speech exceedingly cramps the powers of the mind," but it was to be overcome by proof. In this case the presumption was overruled.

Other specified occupations where fifty or more of the deaf are employed in each are as follows: SPECIFIED OCCUPATIONS OF THE DEAF Laborers not specified 1,217 Servants and waiters 712 Boot and shoemakers and repairers 559 Printers, lithographers and pressmen 382 Carpenters and joiners 371 Dressmakers 314 Seamstresses 306 Tailors 236 CHAPTER IV 41 Painters, glaziers and varnishers 223 Launderers 210 Cigar and tobacco operators 162 Cabinet-makers 119 Merchants and dealers (retail) 115 Iron and steel workers 106 Clerks and copyists 105 Housekeepers and stewards 91 Machinists 87 Blacksmiths 84 Miners and quarrymen 81 Cotton mill operators 78 Barbers and hairdressers 74 Bakers 61 Agents 61 Artists and teachers of art 60 Harness and saddle makers and repairers 59 Draymen, hackmen, teamsters, etc.

250; Ceremonies of Laying of Corner Stone of Rhode Island School, 1907, p. 27. [22] There are no general or organized movements on foot for the prevention of deafness as there are for the prevention of blindness. This is perhaps chiefly because there are believed to be nothing like so many preventable cases of the one as of the other, so much of blindness being due to diseases that might have been avoided without great difficulty, and to accidents and other injuries to the eye. [23] It has been estimated that three-fourths of deafness from primary ear diseases, and one-half from infectious diseases, is preventable.

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