A Journal of the Plague Year (Modern Library Classics) by Daniel Defoe

By Daniel Defoe

Defoe's account of the bubonic plague that swept London in 1665 is still as bright because it is harrowing. in response to Defoe's personal early life thoughts and prodigious examine, A magazine of the Plague Year walks the road among fiction, historical past, and reportage. In meticulous and unsentimental aspect it renders the lifestyle of a urban lower than siege; the usually grotesque clinical precautions and practices of the time; the mass panics of a nervous citizenry; and the solitary travails of Defoe's narrator, a guy who comes to a decision to stay within the urban via all of it, chronicling the process occasions with an unwavering eye. Defoe's magazine is still possibly the best account of a traditional catastrophe ever written.

This glossy Library Paperback vintage is decided from the unique variation released in 1722.

Show description

Read or Download A Journal of the Plague Year (Modern Library Classics) PDF

Best classics books

The Golden Bowl

This selection of literature makes an attempt to assemble the various vintage works that experience stood the attempt of time and supply them at a discounted, reasonable expense, in an enticing quantity in order that each person can take pleasure in them.

Additional info for A Journal of the Plague Year (Modern Library Classics)

Example text

Watchmen. 'That to every infected house there be appointed two watchmen, one for every day, and the other for the night; and that these watchmen have a special care that no person go in or out of such infected houses whereof they have the charge, upon pain of severe punishment. And the said watchmen to do such further offices as the sick house shall need and require: and if the watchman be sent upon any business, to lock up the house and take the key with him; and the watchman by day to attend until ten of the clock at night, and the watchman by night until six in the morning.

It is true that the locking up the doors of people's houses, and setting a watchman there night and day to prevent their stirring out or any coming to them, when perhaps the sound people in the family might have escaped if they had been removed from the sick, looked very hard and cruel; and many people perished in these miserable confinements which, 'tis reasonable to believe, would not have been distempered if they had had liberty, though the plague was in the house; at which the people were very clamorous and uneasy at first, and several violences were committed and injuries offered to the men who were set to watch the houses so shut up; also several people broke out by force in many places, as I shall observe by-and-by.

Neither did it answer the end at all, serving more to make the people desperate, and drive them to such extremities as that they would break out at all adventures. And that which was still worse, those that did thus break out spread the infection farther by their wandering about with the distemper upon them, in their desperate circumstances, than they would otherwise have done; for whoever considers all the particulars in such cases must acknowledge, and we cannot doubt but the severity of those confinements made many people desperate, and made them run out of their houses at all hazards, and with the plague visibly upon them, not knowing either whither to go or what to do, or, indeed, what they did; and many that did so were driven to dreadful exigencies and extremities, and perished in the streets or fields for mere want, or dropped down by the raging violence of the fever upon them.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.52 of 5 – based on 5 votes